James Kabogoza, the assistant commissioner in charge of youth and children in the ministry of gender labour and social development says government is determined to end all forms of child abuse.

So what exactly is government doing about the situation?

Kabogoza says government has put in place measures to try and address the increasing violence against children across the country. Such measures he says include:

  • The national child helpline with a toll free Number 116 which is an emergency number that can be called on all telephone networks at any time a child is in danger.
  • The Children Act CAP 59, which protects children from all forms of abuse.
  • The Children Amendment Bill, which has just been passed by parliament. It has stringent measures against any form of violence.
  • The Trafficking in persons Act, which prohibits the abduction and exploitation of individuals for personal gain,
  • The penal code, which take strict punishments for abduction, bodily harm and death as a result of mutilation and sacrifice.
  • The orphans and other vulnerable children policy and plan.

Kabogoza says there are also family and child protection units at all Police units that can immediately respond to any reported violation of the children’s rights.

He says there are also trained probation officers, community development officers at district and sub county levels who can always be called upon to intervene in cases where suspected abduction and sacrifice is likely to take place,

There are also para social workers and child protection committees at community level, trained specifically to prevent, monitor and respond to any form of violence meted out against children, he adds.

So what exactly is government doing about the situation?

Kabogoza says government has put in place measures to try and address the increasing violence against children across the country. Such measures he says include:

  • The national child helpline with a toll free Number 116 which is an emergency number that can be called on all telephone networks at any time a child is in danger.
  • The Children Act CAP 59, which protects children from all forms of abuse.
  • The Children Amendment Bill, which has just been passed by parliament. It has stringent measures against any form of violence.
  • The Trafficking in persons Act, which prohibits the abduction and exploitation of individuals for personal gain,
  • The penal code, which take strict punishments for abduction, bodily harm and death as a result of mutilation and sacrifice.
  • The orphans and other vulnerable children policy and plan,

Kabogoza says there are also family and child protection units at all Police units that can immediately respond to any reported violation of the children’s rights.

He says there are also trained probation officers, community development officers at district and sub county levels who can always be called upon to intervene in cases where suspected abduction and sacrifice is likely to take place, There are also para social workers and child protection committees at community level, trained specifically to prevent, monitor and respond to any form of violence meted out against children, he adds.

Kabogoza however, reveals that there are still a number of challenges that hinder the proper implementation of these policies on child abuse.

“Child protection is still not viewed as a core development ingredient which can enhance national social economic development. It is for this reason that resources to this area are still minimal. We need enough resources and more stakeholders to come on board so that we can effectively work and eradicate the vice of child abuse in our communities,” says Kabogoza.

Kabogoza urges the media to portray positive stories about children to minimize the trauma victims could have suffered when abused in the communities.

Kabogoza however, reveals that there are still a number of challenges that hinder the proper implementation of these policies on child abuse.

“Child protection is still not viewed as a core development ingredient which can enhance national social economic development. It is for this reason that resources to this area are still minimal. We need enough resources and more stakeholders to come on board so that we can effectively work and eradicate the vice of child abuse in our communities,” says Kabogoza.

Kabogozza urges the media to portray positive stories about children to minimize the trauma victims could have suffered when abused in the communities.